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process

The employee training and development process

Learning happens all the time whether or not you are fully aware of it. Are you a person who forgets to save your work on your computer on a regular basis? If a power failure occurs and you loose some data, do you learn anything? If you say to yourself, “I must remember to save more often”, you have done some learning. This type of learning is called incidental learning; you have learned without really thinking about it or meaning to. On the other hand, intentional learning happens when you engage in activities with an attitude of “what can I learn from this?” Employee development requires you to approach everyday activity with the intention of learning from what is going on around you.

The individual development planning process

The individual development planning process

An individual development plan is prepared by the employee in partnership with his or her supervisor. The plan is based upon the needs of the employee, the position and the organization. A good individual development plan will be interesting, achievable, practical and realistic. It is implemented with the approval of the employee’s supervisor.

Step 1 – Self-assessment

The employee identifies his or her skills, abilities, values, strengths and weaknesses. To conduct a self-assessment:

Use the many self-assessment tools found on the internet
Compare your knowledge, skills and abilities to those identified in your job description
Review performance assessments (performance assessments are often used as the starting place for developing individual development plans)
Ask for feedback from your supervisor

Step 2 – Assess your current position and your work environment

The employee does an assessment of the requirement of his or her position at the present time and how the requirements of the position and/or organization may change. To conduct a position assessment:

Identify the job requirements and performance expectations of your current position
Identify the knowledge, skills and abilities that will enhance your ability to perform your current job
Identify and assess the impact on your position of changes taking place in the work environment such as changes in clients, programs, services and technology.
Based on your analysis in Steps 1 and 2, use the sample Individual Development Plan form to answer the following questions:

What goals do you want to achieve in your career?
Which of these development goals are mutually beneficial to you and your organization?
Write what you would like to achieve as goals. Select two or three goals to work on at a time. Set a time frame for accomplishing your goals.

Step 3 – Identify development activities

Identify the best ways to achieve your development goals.

What methods will you use?
What resources will be required?

Step 4 – Put your plan in action

Once you have prepared a draft of your individual development plan:

Review your plan with your supervisor for his or her input and approval
Start working on your plan
Evaluate your progress and make adjustments as necessary
Celebrate your successes
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Re: Audience analysis Process

Understanding one’s audience is one of the most important elements of effective communication. Audience analysis can help you gain valuable insight about your readers, which can help you to choose and develop a relevant, meaningful topic. It can also help you to create a writing plan that is tailored effectively to your reading audience, with appropriate tone, style, language and content.

There are three main areas to consider when analyzing your audience: demographics, dispositions and knowledge of the topic. For each of these areas, there are a set of questions to answer which will help stimulate your thinking about your audience. In addition to the questions below, you should consider how each of these factors (age, socio-economic status, etc.) affect your readers’ attitudes, expectations and opinions about you and your topic.

Demographic Analysis

      -Is my reading audience homogeneous or heterogeneous? If homogeneous, how are the readers alike? What do they have in common? If heterogeneous, how are the readers different from one another? What do readers have in common despite their differences?

 

      -What is the average age of my readers? What range of ages is represented?

 

      -In terms of socio-economic status, how would I describe my reading audience? Where do they fit in society’s social and economic status?

 

      -What occupations are represented in my reading audience?

 

      -What are my readers’ political and religious affiliations?

 

      -What ethic, racial and cultural groups are represented in my reading audience?

 

    -What is my role in relationship to my reading audience? Are we status equals or re we of mixed status?

Disposition Analysis

      -What might my reading audience expect from this document?

 

      -What might I expect about my readers’ attitudes toward me (the writer) and my topic?

 

      -What concerns or problems do my readers have?

 

      -What interests and goals do my readers have?

 

      -What will motivate my readers? What types of needs do they have?

 

    -What biases or preconceived ideas might my readers have about me and my topic?

Knowledge Analysis

      -How much does my reading audience already know about my topic? What, specifically, do my readers already know about the topic?

 

      -What can I inform my readers about that they do not already know? What new information would my readers benefit from? How could they use this new information?

 

      -At what point of sophistication will I be “talking over the heads” of my readers because my information is too complex? At what point of sophistication will I be “insulting the intelligence” of my readers because my information is too simplistic?

 

    -What questions might my readers have about my topic?

The employee training and development process

Learning happens all the time whether or not you are fully aware of it. Are you a person who forgets to save your work on your computer on a regular basis? If a power failure occurs and you loose some data, do you learn anything? If you say to yourself, “I must remember to save more often”, you have done some learning. This type of learning is called incidental learning; you have learned without really thinking about it or meaning to. On the other hand, intentional learning happens when you engage in activities with an attitude of “what can I learn from this?” Employee development requires you to approach everyday activity with the intention of learning from what is going on around you.

MANAGING THE PROCESS OF TRAINING

The main aspect of this role is coordination, bringing together various elements to ensure that training and learning are planned and carried out effectively. The person in this role may not be a training officer or trainer and should not be expected to carry out all aspects of the work alone. This topic highlights some of what needs to be considered. The diagram below illustrates various stages of the process.

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